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Acta Paediatr. 2015 Nov;104(11):1098-103. doi: 10.1111/apa.13095. Epub 2015 Aug 13.

Preterm birth may be a larger risk factor for increased blood pressure than intrauterine growth restriction.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
2
Department of Neonatology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
3
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden.
4
Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden.
5
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.

Abstract

AIM:

Very low birthweight (VLBW) and prematurity have been associated with an increased risk of high blood pressure (BP). We compared BP and salivary cortisol responses to a stressful situation between adolescents with a VLBW and controls.

METHODS:

We compared three groups aged 12-17 years: 30 born VLBW but appropriate for gestational age (AGA) at a mean of 27 weeks, 19 born VLBW but small for gestational age (SGA) at a mean of 31 weeks and 43 term-born AGA controls. Three consecutive BP measurements were performed before a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination. Salivary cortisol and perceived stress were assessed before and after the MRI.

RESULTS:

Systolic and diastolic BP decreased significantly for each repeated measurement in the VLBW-SGA group and controls, but remained unchanged in the VLBW-AGA group. The third systolic BP measurement was 9-12 mmHg higher in the VLBW-AGA group than the other groups (p < 0.05). There were no differences in salivary cortisol between the groups, before and after the MRI or between the sexes.

CONCLUSION:

Dynamic BP responses differed between adolescents born VLBW-AGA and the other groups, indicating that extremely preterm birth may be a larger risk factor for increased BP than intrauterine growth restriction.

KEYWORDS:

Gender; Hypertension; Intrauterine growth restriction; Preterm; Stress

PMID:
26094552
DOI:
10.1111/apa.13095
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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