Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Biochimie. 2015 Nov;118:344-55. doi: 10.1016/j.biochi.2015.06.004. Epub 2015 Jun 17.

Antimicrobial peptides and proteins in the face of extremes: Lessons from archaeocins.

Author information

1
Molécules de Communication et Adaptation des Microorganismes (MCAM, UMR 7245), Sorbonne Universités, Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, CP 54, 57 rue Cuvier 75005, Paris, France.
2
Molécules de Communication et Adaptation des Microorganismes (MCAM, UMR 7245), Sorbonne Universités, Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, CP 54, 57 rue Cuvier 75005, Paris, France. Electronic address: acarre@mnhn.fr.

Abstract

Archaeocins are ribosomally-synthesized antimicrobial peptides or proteins produced by archaea. Halocins and sulfolobicins are produced by archaea belonging to the order Halobacteriales (Euryarchaeota) and Sulfolobales (Crenarchaeota), respectively. These weapons contribute helping the producer to prosper in spite of the microbial warfare. Given the fact that many archaea thrive in various extreme environments, archaeocins are challenged with inhospitable and destructive environmental conditions. Their structural features and mechanisms of action, which could be original, mostly remain to be deciphered. This review summarizes the present knowledge on halocins and sulfolobicins, the two classes of archaeocins that have been evidenced until now, and brings light on aspects of emerging research such as their ecological role or potential applications. Other antimicrobial compounds produced by archaea are also considered.

KEYWORDS:

Antimicrobial compounds; Archaeocin; Bacteriocin; Halocin; Sulfolobicin

PMID:
26092421
DOI:
10.1016/j.biochi.2015.06.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center