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Sleep Breath. 2016 May;20(2):501-8. doi: 10.1007/s11325-015-1214-y. Epub 2015 Jun 20.

Effects of surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion on obstructive sleep apnea and daytime sleepiness.

Author information

1
School of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes, 3900, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil, 14049-900. pvinha@usp.br.
2
, Av. Bandeirantes, 3900, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil, 14049-900. pvinha@usp.br.
3
School of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes, 3900, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil, 14049-900.
4
School of Dentistry of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, School of Dentistry, Campus USP, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, 14040-904, Brazil.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion (SARME) on obstructive sleep events and daytime sleepiness in adults with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS).

METHODS:

Sixteen individuals (7 women/9 men) aged 40.2 ± 10.2 (range, 24.4 to 62.2 years) with maxillary transverse deficiency and OSAS (respiratory disturbance index [RDI] greater than 5) confirmed with full-night polysomnography (PSG) underwent SARME to evaluate its efficiency for OSAS treatment.

RESULTS:

Several PSG parameters and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) results were compared in selected individuals before and after they underwent SARME. An RDI reduction from 35.4 ± 38.5 to 16.0 ± 19.7 was found, corresponding to a mean decrease of 54.6 % (p = 0.0013). A 56.2 % (33.23 ± 39.5 to 14.5 ± 19.4, p = 0.001) decrease was found in the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), in addition to decreases in the desaturation and microarousal rates, among other parameters. The ESS scores improved from 12.5 ± 5.3 to 7.2 ± 3.5 (p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

SARME promotes an improvement in OSAS symptoms; decreases the rates of respiratory disturbances; microarousal, and desaturation; and reduces daytime sleepiness.

KEYWORDS:

Adults; Disorders of excessive somnolence; Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome; Sleep apnea syndrome; Surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion

PMID:
26092279
DOI:
10.1007/s11325-015-1214-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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