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Environ Health. 2015 Jun 20;14:54. doi: 10.1186/s12940-015-0042-7.

Parma consensus statement on metabolic disruptors.

Author information

1
Division of Extramural Research and Training, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA. heindelj@niehs.nih.gov.
2
Division of Biological Sciences, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, USA.
3
Department of Developmental and Cell Biology, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA.
4
Department of Life Sciences and Systems Biology, University of Turin, Turin, Italy.
5
Department of Cell Biology and Neurosciences, Insituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome, Italy.
6
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Parma, Parma, Italy.
7
Public Health Institute, Berkeley, CA, USA.
8
Interdepartment Center for Environmental Science Research, University of Bologna, Ravenna, Italy.
9
Department of Neuroscience, University of Parma, Parma, Italy.
10
Department of Toxicology and Environmental Health, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
11
Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA, USA.
12
Department of Health Sciences, University of Milano-Bicocca, Monza, Italy.
13
Sheba Medical Center and Tel-Aviv University, Tel -Aviv, Israel.
14
Instituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome, Italy.
15
School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
16
Department of Pediatrics, University of Parma, Parma, Italy.
17
University of Milano-Bicocca, Monza, Italy.
18
Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women's Health, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, USA.
19
Faculty of Medicine, University of Parma, Parma, Italy.
20
Department of Neuroscience and Neuroscience Institute Cavalieri Ottolenghi (NICO), University of Turin, Turin, Italy.
21
Department of Biology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
22
Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.
23
Division of Extramural Research and Training, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.
24
Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital, Parma, Italy.
25
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Parma, Parma, Italy.
26
Department of Biology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA.

Abstract

A multidisciplinary group of experts gathered in Parma Italy for a workshop hosted by the University of Parma, May 16-18, 2014 to address concerns about the potential relationship between environmental metabolic disrupting chemicals, obesity and related metabolic disorders. The objectives of the workshop were to: 1. Review findings related to the role of environmental chemicals, referred to as "metabolic disruptors", in obesity and metabolic syndrome with special attention to recent discoveries from animal model and epidemiology studies; 2. Identify conclusions that could be drawn with confidence from existing animal and human data; 3. Develop predictions based on current data; and 4. Identify critical knowledge gaps and areas of uncertainty. The consensus statements are intended to aid in expanding understanding of the role of metabolic disruptors in the obesity and metabolic disease epidemics, to move the field forward by assessing the current state of the science and to identify research needs on the role of environmental chemical exposures in these diseases. We propose broadening the definition of obesogens to that of metabolic disruptors, to encompass chemicals that play a role in altered susceptibility to obesity, diabetes and related metabolic disorders including metabolic syndrome.

PMID:
26092037
PMCID:
PMC4473834
DOI:
10.1186/s12940-015-0042-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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