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Surg Endosc. 2016 Feb;30(2):684-91. doi: 10.1007/s00464-015-4260-4. Epub 2015 Jun 20.

Structured simulation improves learning of the Fundamental Use of Surgical Energy™ curriculum: a multicenter randomized controlled trial.

Author information

1
Steinberg-Bernstein Centre for Minimally Invasive Surgery, McGill University Health Centre, 1650 Cedar Avenue, Rm L9-309, Montreal, QC, H3G 1A4, Canada. amin.madani@mail.mcgill.ca.
2
Steinberg-Bernstein Centre for Minimally Invasive Surgery, McGill University Health Centre, 1650 Cedar Avenue, Rm L9-309, Montreal, QC, H3G 1A4, Canada. ywatanabe328@gmail.com.
3
Department of Surgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA. nicole.townsend@ucdenver.edu.
4
Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, London, UK. p.pucher@imperial.ac.uk.
5
Department of Surgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA. thomas.robinson@ucdenver.edu.
6
Department of Surgery, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada. patricia.egerszegi@umontreal.ca.
7
Department of Surgery, Harvard University, Boston, MA, USA. jolasky@mah.harvard.edu.
8
Inova Medical Group - Surgical Services, Falls Church, VA, USA. sharon.bachman@inova.org.
9
Department of Surgery, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA. chan.park@duke.edu.
10
Department of Surgery, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada. amin@mcmaster.ca.
11
Department of Surgery, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada. davidtang21@gmail.com.
12
Department of Surgery, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. ehaase@ualberta.ca.
13
Department of Surgery, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada. bardanad@kgh.kari.net.
14
Department of Surgery, Harvard University, Boston, MA, USA. djones1@bidmc.harvard.edu.
15
Steinberg-Bernstein Centre for Minimally Invasive Surgery, McGill University Health Centre, 1650 Cedar Avenue, Rm L9-309, Montreal, QC, H3G 1A4, Canada. melina.vassiliou@mcgill.ca.
16
Steinberg-Bernstein Centre for Minimally Invasive Surgery, McGill University Health Centre, 1650 Cedar Avenue, Rm L9-309, Montreal, QC, H3G 1A4, Canada. gerald.fried@mcgill.ca.
17
Steinberg-Bernstein Centre for Minimally Invasive Surgery, McGill University Health Centre, 1650 Cedar Avenue, Rm L9-309, Montreal, QC, H3G 1A4, Canada. liane.feldman@mcgill.ca.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Energy devices can result in devastating complications to patients. Yet, they remain poorly understood by trainees and surgeons. A single-institution pilot study suggested that structured simulation improves knowledge of the safe use of electrosurgery (ES) among trainees (Madani et al. in Surg Endosc 28(10):2772-2782, 2014). The purpose of this study was to estimate the extent to which the addition of this structured bench-top simulation improves ES knowledge across multiple surgical training programs.

METHODS:

Trainees from 11 residency programs in Canada, the USA and UK participated in a 1-h didactic ES course, based on SAGES' Fundamental Use of Surgical Energy™ (FUSE) curriculum. They were then randomized to one of two groups: an unstructured hands-on session where trainees used ES devices (control group) or a goal-directed hands-on training session (Sim group). Pre- and post-curriculum (immediately and 3 months after) knowledge of the safe use of ES was assessed using separate examinations. Data are expressed as mean (SD) and N (%), *p < 0.05.

RESULTS:

A total of 289 (145 control; 144 Sim) trainees participated, with 186 (96 control; 90 Sim) completing the 3-month assessment. Baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups. Total score on the examination improved from 46% (10) to 84% (10)* for the entire cohort, with higher post-curriculum scores in the Sim group compared with controls [86% (9) vs. 83% (10)*]. All scores declined after 3 months, but remained higher in the Sim group [72% (18) vs. 64% (15)*]. Independent predictors of 3-month score included pre-curriculum score and participation in a goal-directed simulation.

CONCLUSIONS:

This multi-institutional study confirms that a 2-h curriculum based on the FUSE program improves surgical trainees' knowledge in the safe use of ES devices across training programs with various geographic locations and resident volumes. The addition of a structured interactive bench-top simulation component further improved learning.

KEYWORDS:

Curriculum; Education; Electrosurgery; Energy device; FUSE; Simulation

PMID:
26091997
DOI:
10.1007/s00464-015-4260-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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