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Cell. 2015 Jun 18;161(7):1644-55. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2015.05.041.

Embryonic Origin of Postnatal Neural Stem Cells.

Author information

1
Department of Neurological Surgery and the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.
2
Departments of Genetics and Ophthalmology and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
3
Department of Neurological Surgery and the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA. Electronic address: abuylla@stemcell.ucsf.edu.

Abstract

Adult neural stem/progenitor (B1) cells within the walls of the lateral ventricles generate different types of neurons for the olfactory bulb (OB). The location of B1 cells determines the types of OB neurons they generate. Here we show that the majority of mouse B1 cell precursors are produced between embryonic days (E) 13.5 and 15.5 and remain largely quiescent until they become reactivated postnatally. Using a retroviral library carrying over 100,000 genetic tags, we found that B1 cells share a common progenitor with embryonic cells of the cortex, striatum, and septum, but this lineage relationship is lost before E15.5. The regional specification of B1 cells is evident as early as E11.5 and is spatially linked to the production of neurons that populate different areas of the forebrain. This study reveals an early embryonic regional specification of postnatal neural stem cells and the lineage relationship between them and embryonic progenitor cells.

PMID:
26091041
PMCID:
PMC4475276
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2015.05.041
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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