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Science. 2015 Jul 10;349(6244):aac4223. doi: 10.1126/science.aac4223. Epub 2015 Jun 18.

HIV-1 VACCINES. HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies induced by native-like envelope trimers.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY 10065, USA. Department of Medical Microbiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands. jpm2003@med.cornell.edu rws2002@med.cornell.edu.
2
Department of Medical Microbiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
3
Department of Immunology and Microbial Science, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, Neutralizing Antibody Center, and Collaboration for AIDS Vaccine Discovery, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.
4
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY 10065, USA.
5
International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, Neutralizing Antibody Center, and Collaboration for AIDS Vaccine Discovery, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.
6
Division of Human Biology, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA 98109, USA.
7
International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, New York, NY 10004, USA.
8
Pepscan Therapeutics, 8243RC Lelystad, Netherlands.
9
Wisconsin National Primate Research Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53715, USA.
10
Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA. Ragon Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital, MIT, and Harvard, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
11
Department of Medicinal Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA.
12
Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA.
13
Department of Immunology and Microbial Science, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, Neutralizing Antibody Center, and Collaboration for AIDS Vaccine Discovery, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, New York, NY 10004, USA. Ragon Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital, MIT, and Harvard, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
14
International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, Neutralizing Antibody Center, and Collaboration for AIDS Vaccine Discovery, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.
15
Department of Immunology and Microbial Science, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, Neutralizing Antibody Center, and Collaboration for AIDS Vaccine Discovery, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Ragon Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital, MIT, and Harvard, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
16
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY 10065, USA. jpm2003@med.cornell.edu rws2002@med.cornell.edu.

Abstract

A challenge for HIV-1 immunogen design is the difficulty of inducing neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) against neutralization-resistant (tier 2) viruses that dominate human transmissions. We show that a soluble recombinant HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein trimer that adopts a native conformation, BG505 SOSIP.664, induced NAbs potently against the sequence-matched tier 2 virus in rabbits and similar but weaker responses in macaques. The trimer also consistently induced cross-reactive NAbs against more sensitive (tier 1) viruses. Tier 2 NAbs recognized conformational epitopes that differed between animals and in some cases overlapped with those recognized by broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs), whereas tier 1 responses targeted linear V3 epitopes. A second trimer, B41 SOSIP.664, also induced a strong autologous tier 2 NAb response in rabbits. Thus, native-like trimers represent a promising starting point for the development of HIV-1 vaccines aimed at inducing bNAbs.

PMID:
26089353
PMCID:
PMC4498988
DOI:
10.1126/science.aac4223
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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