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Public Health Nutr. 2016 Apr;19(5):804-13. doi: 10.1017/S1368980015001883. Epub 2015 Jun 19.

Factors associated with longitudinal food record compliance in a paediatric cohort study.

Author information

1
1Pediatrics Epidemiology Center,Department of Pediatrics, Morsani College of Medicine,University of South Florida,3650 Spectrum Blvd,Suite 100,Tampa,FL 33612,USA.
2
2Research Institute of Child Nutrition,Dortmund,Germany.
3
3Institute of Diabetes Research, Helmholtz Zentrum München, andForschergruppe Diabetes, Klinikum rechts der Isar,Technische Universität München, andForschergruppe Diabetes e.V.,Neuherberg,Germany.
4
4Center for Biotechnology and Genomic Medicine,Medical College of Georgia,Georgia Regents University,Augusta,GA,USA.
5
5Department of Clinical Sciences,Lund University/CRC,Skåne University Hospital SUS,Malmö,Sweden.
6
6National Institute for Health and Welfare,Terveystieteiden yksikkö,Tampereen yliopisto,Finland.
7
7Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes,University of Colorado School of Medicine,Aurora,CO,USA.
8
8Departments of Pediatrics,Turku University Hospital,Turku,Finland.
9
9Department of Physiology and Pediatrics,University of Turku,Turku,Finland.
10
10Pacific Northwest Diabetes Research Institute,Seattle,WA,USA.
11
11National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases,Bethesda,MD,USA.
12
12Department of Epidemiology,Colorado School of Public Health,Aurora,CO,USA.
13
13National Institute for Health and Welfare,Nutrition Unit,Helsinki,Finland.
14
14Department of Medical Humanities and Social Sciences,Florida State University College of Medicine,Tallahassee,FL,USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Non-compliance with food record submission can induce bias in nutritional epidemiological analysis and make it difficult to draw inference from study findings. We examined the impact of demographic, lifestyle and psychosocial factors on such non-compliance during the first 3 years of participation in a multidisciplinary prospective paediatric study.

DESIGN:

The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) study collects a 3 d food record quarterly during the first year of life and semi-annually thereafter. High compliance with food record completion was defined as the participating families submitting one or more days of food record at every scheduled clinic visit.

SETTING:

Three centres in the USA (Colorado, Georgia/Florida and Washington) and three in Europe (Finland, Germany and Sweden).

SUBJECTS:

Families who finished the first 3 years of TEDDY participation (n 8096).

RESULTS:

High compliance was associated with having a single child, older maternal age, higher maternal education and father responding to study questionnaires. Families showing poor compliance were more likely to be living far from the study centres, from ethnic minority groups, living in a crowded household and not attending clinic visits regularly. Postpartum depression, maternal smoking behaviour and mother working outside the home were also independently associated with poor compliance.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings identified specific groups for targeted strategies to encourage completion of food records, thereby reducing potential bias in multidisciplinary collaborative research.

KEYWORDS:

Dietary assessment; Food record compliance; Longitudinal study; Paediatrics; TEDDY

PMID:
26088478
PMCID:
PMC4684805
DOI:
10.1017/S1368980015001883
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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