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Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2015 Sep;98(3):266-87. doi: 10.1002/cpt.176.

Human Ontogeny of Drug Transporters: Review and Recommendations of the Pediatric Transporter Working Group.

Author information

1
Division of Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics, UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.
2
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Piscataway, New Jersey, USA.
3
NIH Library, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
4
Obstetric and Pediatric Pharmacology and Therapeutics Branch, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Rockville, Maryland, USA.
5
College of Pharmacy, Department of Industrial and Physical Pharmacy, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA.
6
Simulations Plus, lnc., Lancaster, California, USA.
7
University of Tennessee Health Science Center, College of Pharmacy, Memphis, Tennessee, USA.
8
University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA.
9
Department of Pediatrics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.
10
Erasmus MC Sophia Children's Hospital, Intensive Care and Department of Pediatric Surgery, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

Abstract

The critical importance of membrane-bound transporters in pharmacotherapy is widely recognized, but little is known about drug transporter activity in children. In this white paper, the Pediatric Transporter Working Group presents a systematic review of the ontogeny of clinically relevant membrane transporters (e.g., SLC, ABC superfamilies) in intestine, liver, and kidney. Different developmental patterns for individual transporters emerge, but much remains unknown. Recommendations to increase our understanding of membrane transporters in pediatric pharmacotherapy are presented.

PMID:
26088472
PMCID:
PMC4731327
DOI:
10.1002/cpt.176
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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