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CBE Life Sci Educ. 2014 Summer;13(2):187-99. doi: 10.1187/cbe.13-12-0235.

Feedback about Teaching in Higher Ed: Neglected Opportunities to Promote Change.

Author information

1
*Department of Science, Technology, and Mathematics, Gallaudet University, Washington, DC 20002 cara.gormally@gallaudet.edu.
2
Biology Academic Success Center, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616.
3
Department of Plant Biology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

Abstract

Despite ongoing dissemination of evidence-based teaching strategies, science teaching at the university level is less than reformed. Most college biology instructors could benefit from more sustained support in implementing these strategies. One-time workshops raise awareness of evidence-based practices, but faculty members are more likely to make significant changes in their teaching practices when supported by coaching and feedback. Currently, most instructional feedback occurs via student evaluations, which typically lack specific feedback for improvement and focus on teacher-centered practices, or via drop-in classroom observations and peer evaluation by other instructors, which raise issues for promotion, tenure, and evaluation. The goals of this essay are to summarize the best practices for providing instructional feedback, recommend specific strategies for providing feedback, and suggest areas for further research. Missed opportunities for feedback in teaching are highlighted, and the sharing of instructional expertise is encouraged.

PMID:
26086652
PMCID:
PMC4041498
DOI:
10.1187/cbe.13-12-0235
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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