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Alzheimers Dement. 2016 Jan;12(1):21-33. doi: 10.1016/j.jalz.2015.03.004. Epub 2015 Jun 15.

Sleep duration, cognitive decline, and dementia risk in older women.

Author information

1
Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USA. Electronic address: jcchen@usc.edu.
2
Division of Public Health Sciences, Department of Biostatistical Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA.
3
Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Nevada School of Medicine, Reno, NV, USA.
4
Departments of Epidemiology & Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA.
5
Atlanta VA Medical Center and Division of Endocrinology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA.
6
Department of Population Health, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA.
7
Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN, USA.
8
Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
9
Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.
10
University of Wisconsin Center for Women's Health Research, Madison, WI, USA.
11
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Consistent evidence linking habitual sleep duration with risks of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia is lacking.

METHODS:

We conducted a prospective study on 7444 community-dwelling women (aged 65-80 y) with self-reported sleep duration, within the Women's Health Initiative Memory Study in 1995-2008. Incident MCI/dementia cases were ascertained by validated protocols. Cox models were used to adjust for multiple sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, depression, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and other clinical characteristics.

RESULTS:

We found a statistically significant (P = .03) V-shaped association with a higher MCI/dementia risk in women with either short (≤6 hours/night) or long (≥8 hours/night) sleep duration (vs. 7 hours/night). The multicovariate-adjusted hazard for MCI/dementia was increased by 36% in short sleepers irrespective of CVD, and by 35% in long sleepers without CVD. A similar V-shaped association was found with cognitive decline.

DISCUSSION:

In older women, habitual sleep duration predicts the future risk for cognitive impairments including dementia, independent of vascular risk factors.

KEYWORDS:

Cognition; Cognitive decline; Cohort studies; Dementia; Elderly; Longitudinal analysis; Mild cognitive impairment; Sleep duration

PMID:
26086180
PMCID:
PMC4679723
DOI:
10.1016/j.jalz.2015.03.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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