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J Mater Chem B. 2015 Jun 21;3(23):4723-4734.

Positive Charge of "Sticky" Peptides and Proteins Impedes Release From Negatively Charged PLGA Matrices.

Author information

1
Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, PA, USA ; McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
2
Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
3
McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, PA, USA ; Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
4
McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, PA, USA ; Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, PA, USA ; Department of Ophthalmology, University of Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
5
Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, PA, USA ; McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, PA, USA ; Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, PA, USA ; Department of Immunology, University of Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

Abstract

The influence of electrostatic interactions and/or acylation on release of charged ("sticky") agents from biodegradable polymer matrices was systematically characterized. We hypothesized that release of peptides with positive charge would be hindered from negatively charged poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles. Thus, we investigated release of peptides with different degrees of positive charge from several PLGA microparticle formulations, with different molecular weights and/or end groups (acid- or ester-terminated). Indeed, release studies revealed distinct inverse correlations between the amount of positive charge on peptides and their release rates from each PLGA microparticle formulation. Furthermore, we examined the case of peptides with net charge that changes from negative to positive within the pH range observed in degrading microparticles. These charge changing peptides displayed counterintuitive release kinetics, initially releasing faster from slower degrading (less acidic) microparticles, and releasing slower from the faster degrading (more acidic) microparticles. Importantly, trends between agent charge and release rates for model peptides also translated to larger, therapeutically relevant proteins and oligonucleotides. The results of these studies may improve future design of controlled release systems for numerous therapeutic biomolecules exhibiting positive charge, ultimately reducing time-consuming and costly trial and error iterations of such formulations.

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