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J Correct Health Care. 2015 Jul;21(3):255-64. doi: 10.1177/1078345815587510.

Prevalence and Predictors of Chronic Health Conditions of Inmates Newly Admitted to Maximum Security Prisons.

Author information

1
School of Nursing, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.
2
School of Nursing, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.
3
School of Nursing, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.
4
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.
5
School of Nursing, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA ell23@columbia.edu.

Abstract

This study estimated the prevalence of chronic medical conditions and risk predictors of 759 newly admitted inmates in two New York State maximum-security prisons. The most prevalent conditions were respiratory (34.1%), cardiovascular (17.4%), and sexually transmitted diseases (STD; 16.1%); least prevalent were HIV (3.6%), cancer (1.7%), and kidney disease (1.7%). Results of the multivariable logistic regression showed that females had higher risk for all conditions except cardiovascular and liver disease; individuals aged 40 years and older had significantly higher risk for all conditions except asthma and STD; non-Hispanic Black inmates had higher risk for respiratory disease and STD; cigarette smoking was associated with asthma; and obesity was significantly associated with diabetes, asthma, and cardiovascular conditions. These findings highlight the heavy burden of chronic illnesses among newly admitted inmates and the need to address adequate screening, prevention, and treatment services.

KEYWORDS:

chronic medical conditions; correctional facilities; incarcerated population; newly admitted inmates; prevalence

PMID:
26084947
PMCID:
PMC4491502
DOI:
10.1177/1078345815587510
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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