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Sci Rep. 2015 Jun 18;5:11208. doi: 10.1038/srep11208.

Puberty timing associated with diabetes, cardiovascular disease and also diverse health outcomes in men and women: the UK Biobank study.

Author information

1
MRC Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Institute of Metabolic Science, Cambridge Biomedical Campus Box 285, Cambridge, CB2 0QQ.
2
Genetics of Complex Traits, University of Exeter Medical School, RILD Level 3, Royal Devon &Exeter Hospital, Barrack Road, Exeter, EX2 5DW.
3
1] MRC Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Institute of Metabolic Science, Cambridge Biomedical Campus Box 285, Cambridge, CB2 0QQ [2] Department of Paediatrics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge, CB2 0QQ.

Abstract

Early puberty timing is associated with higher risks for type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular disease in women and therefore represents a potential target for early preventive interventions. We characterised the range of diseases and other adverse health outcomes associated with early or late puberty timing in men and women in the very large UK Biobank study. Recalled puberty timing and past/current diseases were self-reported by questionnaire. We limited analyses to individuals of White ethnicity (250,037 women; 197,714 men) and to disease outcomes with at least 500 cases (~ 0.2% prevalence) and we applied stringent correction for multiple testing (corrected threshold P < 7.48 × 10(-5)). In models adjusted for socioeconomic position and adiposity/body composition variables, both in women and men separately, earlier puberty timing was associated with higher risks for angina, hypertension and T2D. Furthermore, compared to the median/average group, earlier or later puberty timing in women or men was associated with higher risks for 48 adverse outcomes, across a range of cancers, cardio-metabolic, gynaecological/obstetric, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, and neuro-cognitive categories. Notably, both early and late menarche were associated with higher risks for early natural menopause in women. Puberty timing in both men and women appears to have a profound impact on later health.

PMID:
26084728
PMCID:
PMC4471670
DOI:
10.1038/srep11208
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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