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Bioprocess Biosyst Eng. 2015 Oct;38(10):1835-44. doi: 10.1007/s00449-015-1424-5. Epub 2015 Jun 19.

The comparative advantages of ethanol and sucrose as co-substrates in the degradation of an anionic surfactant: microbial community selection.

Author information

1
Department of Hydraulics and Sanitation, School of Engineering of São Carlos, University of São Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Sancarlense, 400, 13566-590, São Carlos, SP, Brazil. thais.macedo@usp.br.
2
Department of Hydraulics and Sanitation, School of Engineering of São Carlos, University of São Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Sancarlense, 400, 13566-590, São Carlos, SP, Brazil.
3
Department of Chemical Engineering, Federal University of São Carlos, Rod. Washington Luiz, Km 235, SP 310, 13565-905, São Carlos, SP, Brazil.
4
Department of Hydraulics and Sanitation, School of Engineering of São Carlos, University of São Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Sancarlense, 400, 13566-590, São Carlos, SP, Brazil. varesche@sc.usp.br.

Abstract

The efficiency of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) removal from laundry wastewater and the related microbial community was investigated in an anaerobic fluidized bed reactor (AFBR). The AFBR was operated in three stages, in addition to the biomass adaptation stage without LAS (stage I). The stages were differentiated by their supplementary co-substrates: stage II had sucrose plus ethanol, stage III had only ethanol, and stage IV had no co-substrate. The replacement of sucrose plus ethanol with ethanol only for the substrate composition favored the efficiency of LAS removal, which remained high after the co-substrate was removed (stage II: 52 %; stage III: 73 %; stage IV: 77 %). A transition in the microbial community from Comamonadaceae to Rhodocyclaceae in conjunction with the co-substrate variation was observed using ion sequencing analysis. The microbial community that developed in response to an ethanol-only co-substrate improved LAS degradation more than the community that developed in response to a mixture of sucrose and ethanol, suggesting that ethanol is a better option for enriching an LAS-degrading microbial community.

KEYWORDS:

Carbon source; Co-metabolism; Curvibacter; Dechloromonas; Ion sequencing; Linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS)

PMID:
26084256
DOI:
10.1007/s00449-015-1424-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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