Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nanomedicine (Lond). 2015;10(11):1775-84. doi: 10.2217/nnm.15.27.

Delivery of siRNA to ovarian cancer cells using laser-activated carbon nanoparticles.

Author information

1
School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA.
2
School of Biology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA.

Abstract

AIM:

The RNAi-mediated knockdown of gene expression is an attractive tool for research and therapeutic purposes but its implementation is challenging. Here we report on a new method based on photoacoustic delivery of siRNA developed to address some of these challenges.

MATERIALS & METHODS:

Physical properties and photoacoustic emission of carbon black (CB) particles upon near-infrared laser irradiation were characterized. Next, ovarian cancer cells Hey A8-F8 were exposed to near-infrared nanosecond laser pulses in the presence of siRNA targeting EGFR gene and CB particles. The intracellular delivery of siRNA and silencing of the target gene were determined by specific qPCR assays.

RESULTS & CONCLUSION:

Laser-activated CB nanoparticles generated photoacoustic emission and enabled intracellular delivery of siRNA and significant knockdown of its target EGFR mRNA. This physical method represents a new promising approach to targeted therapeutic delivery of siRNA.

KEYWORDS:

EGFR; intracellular delivery; nanosecond laser; photoacoustics; siRNA

PMID:
26080699
PMCID:
PMC4491916
DOI:
10.2217/nnm.15.27
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center