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J Craniofac Surg. 2015 Jun;26(4):1342-7. doi: 10.1097/SCS.0000000000001719.

Effects of Fatigue and Sleep Deprivation on Microvascular Anastomoses.

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1
*Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Bagcilar Research and Training Hospital †Department of Plastic, Reconstructive, and Aesthetic Surgery, Istanbul Kemerburgaz University, Istanbul, Turkey.

Abstract

Previous studies have investigated the effects of various human-based factors, such as tremor, exercise, and posture, on microsurgical performance. In this study, the authors investigated the effects of sleep deprivation and fatigue on microsurgery. A total of 48 Wistar Hannover rats were divided into 3 groups (16 anastomoses in each group) to be operated on at 3 different times: in the morning at 08:00 hours (group I), at night on the same day (01:00 h, group II), and the next morning at 09:00 hours (group III) following a night with no sleep. The blindly evaluated parameters were anastomotic times, error score (ES), global rating scale (GRS), autopsy scores (ASs), and patency. There was progressive decrease in the anastomosis times between the groups (P > 0.05). The patency rates were 93% in group I, 81% in group II, and 81% in group III (P > 0.05). The ES (P < 0.01), AS (P < 0.001), and GRS (P < 0.001) revealed significant results. Comparison between the groups showed that other than the anastomosis time, the night group (group II) showed a significant drop when compared with the preceding morning group (group I) (ES P < 0.01, AS P < .001, and GRS P < 0.001). In most of the parameters, the errors occurred with fatigue after the day and reached a maximum at the end of the day (group II). This study provides valuable data that might have significant medicolegal implications for controversial issues. More studies, however, including multiple surgeons with different experience levels, might be required to fully elucidate the overall effects of fatigue and sleep deprivation on microsurgery.

PMID:
26080191
DOI:
10.1097/SCS.0000000000001719
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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