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Genome Biol. 2015 Jun 16;16:125. doi: 10.1186/s13059-015-0689-y.

Rewriting the blueprint of life by synthetic genomics and genome engineering.

Author information

1
Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA.
2
Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA. chandra@jhmi.edu.

Abstract

Advances in DNA synthesis and assembly methods over the past decade have made it possible to construct genome-size fragments from oligonucleotides. Early work focused on synthesis of small viral genomes, followed by hierarchical synthesis of wild-type bacterial genomes and subsequently on transplantation of synthesized bacterial genomes into closely related recipient strains. More recently, a synthetic designer version of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome III has been generated, with numerous changes from the wild-type sequence without having an impact on cell fitness and phenotype, suggesting plasticity of the yeast genome. A project to generate the first synthetic yeast genome--the Sc2.0 Project--is currently underway.

PMID:
26076868
PMCID:
PMC4469412
DOI:
10.1186/s13059-015-0689-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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