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J Consult Clin Psychol. 2015 Aug;83(4):760-72. doi: 10.1037/ccp0000028. Epub 2015 Jun 15.

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) versus acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for dementia family caregivers with significant depressive symptoms: Results of a randomized clinical trial.

Author information

1
Psychology Department, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos.
2
Department of Biological and Clinical Psychology, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid.
3
Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego.
4
Department of Psychology, Universidad CEU San Pablo.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The differential efficacy of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for dementia family caregivers' is analyzed through a randomized controlled trial.

METHOD:

Participants were 135 caregivers with high depressive symptomatology who were randomly allocated to the intervention conditions or a control group (CG). Pre-, postintervention, and follow-up measurements assessed depressive symptomatology, anxiety, leisure, dysfunctional thoughts, and experiential avoidance.

RESULTS:

Depression: Significant effects of interventions compared with CG were found for CBT (p < .001, d = 0.98, number needed to treat [NNT] = 3.61) and ACT (p < .001, d = 1.17, NNT = 3.53) at postintervention, but were maintained only at follow-up for CBT (p = .02, d = 0.74, NNT = 9.71). Clinically significant change was observed in 26.7% participants in CBT, 24.2% in ACT, and 0% in CG. At follow-up, 10.53% in CBT and 4% in ACT were recovered (0% CG). Anxiety: At postintervention, ACT participants showed lower anxiety than CBT participants (p < .05, d = 0.50) and CG participants (p < .01, d = 0.79, NNT = 3.86), with no effects at follow-up. At postintervention, 23.33% in CBT, 36.36% in ACT, and 6.45% in CG showed clinically significant change. At follow-up, 26.32% in CBT, 36% in ACT, and 13.64% in CG were recovered. Significant changes at postintervention were found in leisure and dysfunctional thoughts in both ACT and CBT, with changes in experiential avoidance only for ACT.

CONCLUSION:

Similar results were obtained for ACT and CBT. ACT seems to be a viable and effective treatment for dementia caregivers.

PMID:
26075381
DOI:
10.1037/ccp0000028
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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