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J Clin Periodontol. 2015 Jul;42(7):688-96. doi: 10.1111/jcpe.12424. Epub 2015 Jul 14.

Anti-VEGFs hinder bone healing and implant osseointegration in rat tibiae.

Author information

1
Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.
2
College of Dentistry, University of Dammam, Dammam, Saudi Arabia.
3
Faculty of Dentistry, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada.

Abstract

AIM:

To assess the effect of anti-vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) on bone healing (defect volume) and implant osseointegration (bone-implant contact per cent) in rat tibia.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

In Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 36), a unicortical defect was created in the right tibia and a titanium implant was placed in the left tibia of each rat. Rats were assigned into three groups and received either anti-vascular endothelial growth factor neutralizing antibody, Ranibizumab or saline (control). Two weeks following surgery, rats were euthanized and bone samples were retrieved. Bone healing and osseointegration were assessed using micro-CT and histomorphometry. One-way anova followed by the Tukey's test was used for data analyses.

RESULTS:

The volume of the bone defects in the anti-VEGF group (2.48 ± 0.33 mm(3) ) was larger (p = 0.026) than in the controls (2.11 ± 0.36 mm(3) ) as measured by μ-CT. Bone-implant contact percent in the anti-VEGF (19.9 ± 9.4%) and Ranibizumab (21.7 ± 9.2%) groups were lower (p < 0.00) than in the control group (41.8 ± 12.4%).

CONCLUSIONS:

The results of this study suggest that drugs that inhibit the activity of vascular endothelial growth factor (i.e. anti-VEGF) may hinder bone healing and implant osseointegration in rat tibiae.

KEYWORDS:

Ranibizumab; VEGF; angiogenesis; anti-VEGF; bone healing; osseointegration

PMID:
26073407
DOI:
10.1111/jcpe.12424
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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