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Epilepsy Behav. 2017 Jun;71(Pt B):218-225. doi: 10.1016/j.yebeh.2015.05.025. Epub 2015 Jun 11.

Molecular and neurochemical substrates of the audiogenic seizure strains: The GASH:Sal model.

Author information

1
Research Department, Neuropsychopharmacology Unit, Albacete General Hospital, 37 Hermanos Falcó Street, Albacete E-02006, Spain. Electronic address: anaprima05@hotmail.com.
2
Department of Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Castilla-La Mancha, 14 Almansa Street, Albacete E-02006, Spain. Electronic address: JoseDaniel.Aroca@uclm.es.
3
Department of Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Castilla-La Mancha, 14 Almansa Street, Albacete E-02006, Spain. Electronic address: Francisco.SSanchez@uclm.es.
4
INCYL, University of Salamanca, 1 Pintor Gallego Street, Salamanca E-37007, Spain. Electronic address: lmp@usal.es.
5
INCYL, University of Salamanca, 1 Pintor Gallego Street, Salamanca E-37007, Spain. Electronic address: lopezde@usal.es.
6
Department of Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Castilla-La Mancha, 14 Almansa Street, Albacete E-02006, Spain. Electronic address: julio.escribano@uclm.es.
7
Research Department, Neuropsychopharmacology Unit, Albacete General Hospital, 37 Hermanos Falcó Street, Albacete E-02006, Spain. Electronic address: carlosd@sescam.jccm.es.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Animal models of audiogenic epilepsy are useful tools to understand the mechanisms underlying human reflex epilepsies. There is accumulating evidence regarding behavioral, anatomical, electrophysiological, and genetic substrates of audiogenic seizure strains, but there are still aspects concerning their neurochemical basis that remain to be elucidated. Previous studies have shown the involved of γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) in audiogenic seizures. The aim of our research was to clarify the role of the GABAergic system in the generation of epileptic seizures in the genetic audiogenic seizure-prone hamster (GASH:Sal) strain.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

We studied the K+/Cl- cotransporter KCC2 and β2-GABAA-type receptor (GABAAR) and β3-GABAAR subunit expressions in the GASH:Sal both at rest and after repeated sound-induced seizures in different brain regions using the Western blot technique. We also sequenced the coding region for the KCC2 gene both in wild- type and GASH:Sal hamsters.

RESULTS:

Lower expression of KCC2 protein was found in GASH:Sal when compared with controls at rest in several brain areas: hippocampus, cortex, cerebellum, hypothalamus, pons-medulla, and mesencephalon. Repeated induction of seizures caused a decrease in KCC2 protein content in the inferior colliculus and hippocampus and an increase in the pons-medulla. When compared to controls, the basal β2-GABAAR subunit in the GASH:Sal was overexpressed in the inferior colliculus, rest of the mesencephalon, and cerebellum, whereas basal β3 subunit levels were lower in the inferior colliculus and rest of the mesencephalon. Repeated seizures increased β2 both in the inferior colliculus and in the hypothalamus and β3 in the hypothalamus. No differences in the KCC2 gene-coding region were found between GASH:Sal and wild-type hamsters.

CONCLUSIONS:

These data indicate that GABAergic system functioning is impaired in the GASH:Sal strain, and repeated seizures seem to aggravate this dysfunction. These results have potential clinical relevance and support the validity of employing the GASH:Sal strain as a model to study the neurochemistry of genetic reflex epilepsy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Genetic and Reflex Epilepsies, Audiogenic Seizures and Strains: From Experimental Models to the Clinic".

KEYWORDS:

Animal models of seizures; GABA(A) receptor subunits; Genetic epilepsy; Inferior colliculus convulsions; KCC2; Reflex epilepsy

PMID:
26071997
DOI:
10.1016/j.yebeh.2015.05.025
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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