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Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2015 Sep;24(9):1319-26. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-15-0199. Epub 2015 Jun 12.

Gallbladder Cancer Incidence and Mortality, United States 1999-2011.

Author information

1
Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia. shenley@cdc.gov.
2
Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Gallbladder cancer is a rare cancer with unusual distribution, and few population-based estimates for the United States have been published.

METHODS:

Using population-based cancer incidence and mortality data, we examined U.S. gallbladder cancer incidence and death rates for 2007-2011 and trends for 1999-2011.

RESULTS:

During 2007 to 2011, approximately 3,700 persons were diagnosed with primary gallbladder cancer (rate = 1.13 cases per 100,000) and 2,000 died from the disease (rate = 0.62 deaths per 100,000) each year in the United States. Two thirds of gallbladder cancer cases and deaths occurred among women. Gallbladder cancer incidence and death rates were three times higher among American Indian and Alaska Native persons than non-Hispanic white persons. By state, gallbladder cancer incidence and death rates ranged by about 2-fold. During 1999 to 2011, gallbladder cancer incidence rates decreased among women but remained level among men; death rates declined among women but stabilized among men after declining from 1999 to 2006. Gallbladder cancer incidence rates increased in some subgroups, notably among black persons, those aged <45 years, and for endocrine tumors.

CONCLUSIONS:

Data from U.S. population-based cancer registries confirm that gallbladder cancer incidence and death rates are higher among women than men, highest among American Indian and Alaska Native persons, and differ by region. While overall incidence and death rates decreased during 1999 to 2011, incidence rates increased among some small subgroups.

IMPACT:

Surveillance of gallbladder cancer incidence and mortality, particularly to monitor increases in subgroups, may provide clues to etiology and stimulate further research.

PMID:
26070529
DOI:
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-15-0199
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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