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Rev Gastroenterol Mex. 2015 Apr-Jun;80(2):171-4. doi: 10.1016/j.rgmx.2015.04.002. Epub 2015 Jun 10.

Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth prevalence in celiac disease patients is similar in healthy subjects and lower in irritable bowel syndrome patients.

[Article in English, Spanish]

Author information

1
Sección de Gastroenterología, Departamento de Medicina Interna, CEMIC, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Electronic address: drjuanslasa@gmail.com.
2
Sección de Gastroenterología, Departamento de Medicina Interna, CEMIC, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Untreated celiac disease has traditionally been linked to a greater risk for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, but the existing evidence is inconclusive.

AIMS:

To compare the prevalence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in subjects with celiac disease compared with control subjects and patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

The study included 15 untreated celiac disease patients, 15 subjects with irritable bowel syndrome, and 15 healthy controls. All enrolled patients underwent a lactulose breath test measuring hydrogen and methane. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth was defined according to previously published criteria.

RESULTS:

No differences were found in relation to age or sex. The prevalence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth was similar between the celiac disease patients and the controls (20 vs. 13.33%, P=NS), whereas it was higher in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (66.66%, P<05).

CONCLUSION:

There was no difference in the prevalence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth between the untreated celiac disease patients and healthy controls.

KEYWORDS:

Celiac disease; Enfermedad celíaca; Irritable bowel syndrome; Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth; Sobrecrecimiento bacteriano; Síndrome de intestino irritable

PMID:
26070374
DOI:
10.1016/j.rgmx.2015.04.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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