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J Colloid Interface Sci. 2015 Oct 1;455:172-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jcis.2015.05.037. Epub 2015 May 29.

Tuneable stability of nanoemulsions fabricated using spontaneous emulsification by biopolymer electrostatic deposition.

Author information

1
Biopolymers and Colloids Research Laboratory, Department of Food Science, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003, USA.
2
Department of Food Physics and Meat Science, Institute of Food Science and Biotechnology, University of Hohenheim, Garbenstrasse 21/25, 70599 Stuttgart, Germany.
3
Biopolymers and Colloids Research Laboratory, Department of Food Science, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003, USA; Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, P. O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia. Electronic address: mcclements@foodsci.umass.edu.

Abstract

Nanoemulsions can be formed spontaneously from surfactant-oil-water systems using low energy methods. In this work, we showed that the droplets in oil-in-water nanoemulsions fabricated by spontaneous emulsification could be coated with an anionic biopolymer (beet pectin) using electrostatic deposition. Nanoemulsions were formed by titrating oil (medium chain triglycerides) and surfactant (polyoxyethylene sorbitan monostearate+lauric arginate) mixtures into an aqueous solution (10 mM citrate buffer, pH 4). Lauric arginate was used to generate a positive charge on the droplet surfaces, thereby enabling subsequent electrostatic deposition of anionic pectin. Extensive droplet aggregation occurred when intermediate pectin concentrations were used due to bridging flocculation. However, stable anionic pectin-coated lipid droplets could be formed at high pectin concentrations. These results demonstrate the possibility of tailoring the functionality of lipid nanodroplets produced by spontaneous emulsification.

KEYWORDS:

Aggregation; Lauric arginate; Layer-by-layer electrostatic depositioning; Low energy emulsification; Multilayer emulsion; Sugar beet pectin

PMID:
26070187
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcis.2015.05.037
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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