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J Adolesc. 2015 Aug;43:96-9. doi: 10.1016/j.adolescence.2015.05.010. Epub 2015 Jun 10.

Brief report: The bystander effect in cyberbullying incidents.

Author information

1
Institute for Research on Children, Youth and Families, Faculty of Social Studies, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic. Electronic address: hmachack@fss.muni.cz.
2
Institute for Research on Children, Youth and Families, Faculty of Social Studies, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.

Abstract

This study examined the bystander effect in cyberbullying. Using self-reported data from 257 Czech respondents who had witnessed a cyberbullying attack, we tested whether provided help decreased with increased number of other bystanders. We controlled for several individual and contextual factors, including empathy, social self-efficacy, empathic response to victimization, and relationship to the victim. Results showed that participants tend to help the victims more in incidents with only one or two other bystanders. We also found that, as in the "offline" realm, bystander effect is not linear: no significant differences were found between incidents with a moderate number (3-10) and a larger number of total bystanders. Our findings, thus, provide support for the presence of the bystander effect in cyberbullying.

KEYWORDS:

Bystander effect; Bystanders; Cyberbullying

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