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EMBO J. 2015 Aug 4;34(15):1992-2007. doi: 10.15252/embj.201490899. Epub 2015 Jun 11.

Transcriptional repression by MYB3R proteins regulates plant organ growth.

Author information

1
Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya, Japan.
2
Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya, Japan JST, CREST, Chikusa, Nagoya, Japan.
3
WPI Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya, Japan Graduate School of Sciences, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya, Japan.
4
Graduate School of Sciences, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya, Japan JST ERATO Higashiyama Live-Holonics Project, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya, Japan.
5
Graduate School of Biological Sciences, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Ikoma, Nara, Japan.
6
Graduate School of Biological Sciences, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Ikoma, Nara, Japan RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan.
7
Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan.
8
Department of Biology, Tokyo Gakugei University, Koganei, Tokyo, Japan.
9
Center for Plant Molecular Biology, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.
10
Institute of Plant Biology, Biological Research Centre, Szeged, Hungary.
11
Laboratory of Proteomic Research, Biological Research Centre, Szeged, Hungary.
12
Graduate School of Sciences, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya, Japan.
13
Center for Gene Research, Division of Biological Science, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya, Japan.
14
WPI Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya, Japan Graduate School of Sciences, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya, Japan JST ERATO Higashiyama Live-Holonics Project, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya, Japan.
15
The National Plant Phenomics Centre, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth, UK.
16
Department of Applied Genetics and Cell Biology, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Austria.
17
RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan.
18
Graduate School of Biological Sciences, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Ikoma, Nara, Japan JST, CREST, Ikoma, Nara, Japan.
19
Institute of Plant Biology, Biological Research Centre, Szeged, Hungary Royal Holloway, School of Biological Sciences, University of London, Egham, Surrey, UK.
20
Royal Holloway, School of Biological Sciences, University of London, Egham, Surrey, UK.
21
Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya, Japan JST, CREST, Chikusa, Nagoya, Japan masakito@agr.nagoya-u.ac.jp.

Abstract

In multicellular organisms, temporal and spatial regulation of cell proliferation is central for generating organs with defined sizes and morphologies. For establishing and maintaining the post-mitotic quiescent state during cell differentiation, it is important to repress genes with mitotic functions. We found that three of the Arabidopsis MYB3R transcription factors synergistically maintain G2/M-specific genes repressed in post-mitotic cells and restrict the time window of mitotic gene expression in proliferating cells. The combined mutants of the three repressor-type MYB3R genes displayed long roots, enlarged leaves, embryos, and seeds. Genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that MYB3R3 binds to the promoters of G2/M-specific genes and to E2F target genes. MYB3R3 associates with the repressor-type E2F, E2FC, and the RETINOBLASTOMA RELATED proteins. In contrast, the activator MYB3R4 was in complex with E2FB in proliferating cells. With mass spectrometry and pairwise interaction assays, we identified some of the other conserved components of the multiprotein complexes, known as DREAM/dREAM in human and flies. In plants, these repressor complexes are important for periodic expression during cell cycle and to establish a post-mitotic quiescent state determining organ size.

KEYWORDS:

DREAM complex; G2/M phase; MYB transcription factors; cell cycle regulation; cell differentiation

PMID:
26069325
PMCID:
PMC4551348
DOI:
10.15252/embj.201490899
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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