Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Science. 2015 Jun 12;348(6240):1241-4. doi: 10.1126/science.1255905. Epub 2015 Jun 11.

BRAIN NETWORKS. Correlated gene expression supports synchronous activity in brain networks.

Author information

1
Functional Imaging in Neuropsychiatric Disorders Laboratory, Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA. Laboratory of Neurology and Imaging of Cognition, Department of Neuroscience, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. jonas.richiardi@unige.ch greicius@stanford.edu.
2
Functional Imaging in Neuropsychiatric Disorders Laboratory, Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.
3
The War Related Illness and Injury Study Center, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA, USA. Functional Imaging in Neuropsychiatric Disorders Laboratory, Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.
4
Advanced MRI Section, Laboratory of Functional and Molecular Imaging, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
5
Cerebral Imaging Centre, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montreal, Canada. Departments of Psychiatry and Biomedical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.
6
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany.
7
Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK.
8
Institute of Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
9
Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
10
Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. Department of Psychiatry, Université de Montréal, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Ste Justine Hospital, Montréal, Canada.
11
Department of Addictive Behaviour and Addiction Medicine, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany.
12
Department of Cognitive and Clinical Neuroscience, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany.
13
Neurospin, Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, Paris, France.
14
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Campus Charité Mitte, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
15
Institute of Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. Departments of Psychiatry and Psychology, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, USA.
16
School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.
17
Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, INSERM Unit 1000 "Neuroimaging and Psychiatry," University Paris Sud, Orsay, France. INSERM Unit 1000 at Maison de Solenn, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris (APHP), Cochin Hospital, University Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France.
18
Rotman Research Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. School of Psychology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.
19
The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
20
Department of Genetic Epidemiology in Psychiatry, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany.
21
Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience Institute and Department of Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
22
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, and Neuroimaging Center, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
23
Department of Psychopharmacology, Central Institute of Mental Health, Faculty of Clinical Medicine Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany.
24
Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. Medical Research Council (MRC) Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry (SGDP) Centre, London, UK.
25
Allen Institute for Brain Science, Seattle, WA, USA.
26
Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA.
27
Functional Imaging in Neuropsychiatric Disorders Laboratory, Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA. jonas.richiardi@unige.ch greicius@stanford.edu.

Abstract

During rest, brain activity is synchronized between different regions widely distributed throughout the brain, forming functional networks. However, the molecular mechanisms supporting functional connectivity remain undefined. We show that functional brain networks defined with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging can be recapitulated by using measures of correlated gene expression in a post mortem brain tissue data set. The set of 136 genes we identify is significantly enriched for ion channels. Polymorphisms in this set of genes significantly affect resting-state functional connectivity in a large sample of healthy adolescents. Expression levels of these genes are also significantly associated with axonal connectivity in the mouse. The results provide convergent, multimodal evidence that resting-state functional networks correlate with the orchestrated activity of dozens of genes linked to ion channel activity and synaptic function.

PMID:
26068849
PMCID:
PMC4829082
DOI:
10.1126/science.1255905
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center