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PLoS Comput Biol. 2015 Jun 12;11(6):e1004331. doi: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1004331. eCollection 2015 Jun.

Stochastic Dynamics Underlying Cognitive Stability and Flexibility.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Goethe University Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, Germany; Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany.
2
Department of Psychology, Goethe University Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, Germany; Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany; Department of Neuroradiology, Heidelberg University, Im Neuenheimer Feld, Heidelberg, Germany; Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands; IDeA Center for Individual Development and Adaptive Education, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.

Abstract

Cognitive stability and flexibility are core functions in the successful pursuit of behavioral goals. While there is evidence for a common frontoparietal network underlying both functions and for a key role of dopamine in the modulation of flexible versus stable behavior, the exact neurocomputational mechanisms underlying those executive functions and their adaptation to environmental demands are still unclear. In this work we study the neurocomputational mechanisms underlying cue based task switching (flexibility) and distractor inhibition (stability) in a paradigm specifically designed to probe both functions. We develop a physiologically plausible, explicit model of neural networks that maintain the currently active task rule in working memory and implement the decision process. We simplify the four-choice decision network to a nonlinear drift-diffusion process that we canonically derive from a generic winner-take-all network model. By fitting our model to the behavioral data of individual subjects, we can reproduce their full behavior in terms of decisions and reaction time distributions in baseline as well as distractor inhibition and switch conditions. Furthermore, we predict the individual hemodynamic response timecourse of the rule-representing network and localize it to a frontoparietal network including the inferior frontal junction area and the intraparietal sulcus, using functional magnetic resonance imaging. This refines the understanding of task-switch-related frontoparietal brain activity as reflecting attractor-like working memory representations of task rules. Finally, we estimate the subject-specific stability of the rule-representing attractor states in terms of the minimal action associated with a transition between different rule states in the phase-space of the fitted models. This stability measure correlates with switching-specific thalamocorticostriatal activation, i.e., with a system associated with flexible working memory updating and dopaminergic modulation of cognitive flexibility. These results show that stochastic dynamical systems can implement the basic computations underlying cognitive stability and flexibility and explain neurobiological bases of individual differences.

PMID:
26068119
PMCID:
PMC4466596
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pcbi.1004331
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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