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Toxicol Lett. 2015 Sep 2;237(2):79-88. doi: 10.1016/j.toxlet.2015.06.006. Epub 2015 Jun 9.

Protective effect of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on ethanol-induced intestinal barrier injury both in vitro and in vivo.

Author information

1
Division of General Surgery, Peking University First Hospital, Peking University, 8 Xi ShiKu Street, Beijing 100034, PR China.
2
Animal Experiment Center, Peking University First Hospital, Peking University, 8 Xi ShiKu Street, Beijing 100034, PR China.
3
Division of General Surgery, Peking University First Hospital, Peking University, 8 Xi ShiKu Street, Beijing 100034, PR China. Electronic address: wangpengyuan2014@126.com.

Abstract

Studies have suggested the role of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) in protecting intestinal barrier function from injuries induced by multiple reagents. Vitamin D deficiency was reported to be associated with poor prognosis in patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD). This study is designed to investigate the effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 on ethanol-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction and the underlying mechanisms utilizing Caco-2 cell monolayers and a mouse model with acute ethanol injury. In Caco-2 monolayers, ethanol significantly increased monolayer permeability, disrupted TJ distribution, increased phosphorylation level of MLC, and induced generation of ROS compared with controls. However, pre-treatment with 1,25(OH)2D3 greatly ameliorated the ethanol-induced barrier dysfunction, TJ disruption, phosphorylation level of MLC, and generation of ROS compared with ethanol-exposed monolayers. Mice fed with vitamin d-sufficient diet had a higher plasma level of 25(OH)D3 and were more resistant to ethanol-induced acute intestinal barrier injury compared with the vitamin d-deficient group. These results suggest that the suppression of generation of ROS and increased phosphorylation level of MLC might be one of the mechanisms underlying the protective effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 on ethanol-induced intestinal barrier injury and provide evidence for the application of vitamin D as therapeutic factors against ethanol-induced gut leakiness.

KEYWORDS:

1,25(OH)(2)D(3); Ethanol; MLC; Reactive oxygen species (ROS); TEER; Tight junction

PMID:
26068064
DOI:
10.1016/j.toxlet.2015.06.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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