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Kidney Blood Press Res. 2015;40(3):323-34. doi: 10.1159/000368508. Epub 2015 May 31.

High salt intake increases blood pressure in normal rats: putative role of 20-HETE and no evidence on changes in renal vascular reactivity.

Author information

1
Department of Renal and Body Fluid Physiology, M. Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland.

Abstract

Background/Aims . High salt (HS) intake may elevate blood pressure (BP), also in animals without genetic salt sensitivity. The development of salt-dependent hypertension could be mediated by endogenous vasoactive agents; here we examined the role of vasodilator epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and vasoconstrictor 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE).

METHODS:

In conscious Wistar rats on HS diet systolic BP (SBP) was examined after chronic elevation of EETs using 4-[4-(3-adamantan-1-yl-ureido)-cyclohexyloxy]-benzoic acid (c-AUCB), a blocker of soluble epoxide hydrolase, or after inhibition of 20-HETE with 1-aminobenzotriazole (ABT). Thereafter, in acute experiments the responses of renal artery blood flow (Transonic probe) and renal regional perfusion (laser-Doppler) to intrarenal acetylcholine (ACh) or norepinephrine were determined.

RESULTS:

HS diet increased urinary 20-HETE excretion. The SBP increase was not reduced by c-AUCB but prevented by ABT until day 5 of HS exposure. Renal vasomotor responses to ACh or norepinephrine were similar on standard and HS diet. ABT but not c-AUCB abolished the responses to ACh. Conclusions . 20-HETE seems to mediate the early-phase HS diet-induced BP increase while EETs are not engaged in the process. Since HS exposure did not alter renal vasodilator responses to Ach, endothelial dysfunction is not a critical factor in the mechanism of salt-induced blood pressure elevation.

PMID:
26067851
PMCID:
PMC4583220
DOI:
10.1159/000368508
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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