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J Reward Defic Syndr. 2015;1(1):24-35.

Using the Neuroadaptagen KB200z™ to Ameliorate Terrifying, Lucid Nightmares in RDS Patients: the Role of Enhanced, Brain-Reward, Functional Connectivity and Dopaminergic Homeostasis.

Author information

1
Center for Psychiatric Medicine, North Andover, MA, USA.
2
Department of Psychiatry and McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL, USA ; Department of Clinical Medicine, Malibu Beach Recovery Center, Malibu Beach, CA, USA ; Department of Addiction Medicine, Victory Nutrition International, LLC., Lederoch, PA, USA ; Community Mental Health Institute, Center for Clinical & Translational Science, University of Vermont and Department of Psychiatry, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT, USA ; Dominion Diagnostics, Inc. North Kingstown, RI, USA ; Center for Genomics and Applied Gene Technology, Institute of Integrative Omics and Applied Biotechnology (IIOAB), Nonakuri, Purbe Medinpur, West Bengal, India ; Center for RDS Research, Victory Nutrition, LLC, Austin, TX, USA ; Department of Nutrigenomics, RDSolutions, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT, USA ; Department of Personalized Medicine, IGENE, LLC., Austin, TX, USA.
3
Departments of Psychiatry, Anatomy and Neurobiology, and Boston VA and Boston University School of Medicine, MA, USA.
4
Department of Psychiatry and McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL, USA.
5
Department of Clinical Psychology and Addiction, Institute of Psychology, Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary.
6
Divisions of Addiction Services, & Applied Clinical Research & Education, Dominion Diagnostics, LLC, North Kingstown, RI, USA.
7
Departments of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences at the Keck, University of Southern California, School of Medicine, CA, USA ; Director of Research, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) Educational Foundation, Washington, D.C, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Lucid Dreams are a form of dream life, during which the dreamer may be aware that he/she is dreaming, can stop/re-start the dreams, depending on the pleasantness or unpleasant nature of the dream, and experiences the dream as if he/she were fully awake. Depending on their content, they may be pleasant, un-pleasant or terrifying, at least in the context of patients, who also exhibit characteristics of Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS) and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

CASE SERIES:

We present eight clinical cases, with known substance abuse, childhood abuse and diagnosed PTSD/RDS. The administration of a putative dopamine agonist, KB200Z™, was associated with the elimination of unpleasant and/or terrifying, lucid dreams in 87.5% of the cases presented, whereas one very heavy cocaine abuser showed a minimal response. These results required the continuous use of this nutraceutical. The lucid dreams themselves were distinguishable from typical, PTSD nightmares insofar as their content did not appear to reflect a symbolic rendition of an originally-experienced, historical trauma. Each of the cases was diagnosed with a form of RDS, i.e., ADHD, ADD, and/or Tourette's syndrome. They all also suffered from some form of Post-Traumatic-Stress-Disorder (PTSD) and other psychiatric diagnoses as well.

CONCLUSION:

The reduction or elimination of terrifying Lucid Dreams seemed to be dependent on KB220Z, whereby voluntary stopping of the agent results in reinstatement of the terrifying non-pleasant nature of the dreams. Following more required research on a much larger population we anticipate confirmation of these seemingly interesting observations. If these results in a small number of patients are indeed confirmed we may have found a frontline solution to a very perplexing and complicated symptom known as lucid dreams.

KEYWORDS:

Functional brain connectivity; KB200Z; Lucid dreams; Nightmares; PTSD; Putative natural dopamine agonist

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