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J Obes. 2015;2015:619734. doi: 10.1155/2015/619734. Epub 2015 Apr 28.

Edmonton Obesity Staging System Prevalence and Association with Weight Loss in a Publicly Funded Referral-Based Obesity Clinic.

Author information

1
School of Kinesiology & Health Science, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada M3J 1P3.
2
The Wharton Medical Clinic, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8L 5G8.
3
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada T6G 2G3.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To determine the distribution of EOSS stages and differences in weight loss achieved according to EOSS stage, in patients attending a referral-based publically funded multisite weight management clinic.

SUBJECTS/METHODS:

5,787 obese patients were categorized using EOSS staging using metabolic risk factors, medication use, and severity of doctor diagnosis of obesity-related physiological, functional, and psychological comorbidities from electronic patient files.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of EOSS stages 0 (no risk factors or comorbidities), 1 (mild conditions), 2 (moderate conditions), and 3 (severe conditions) was 1.7%, 10.4%, 84.0%, and 3.9%, respectively. Prehypertension (63%), hypertension (76%), and knee replacement (33%) were the most common obesity-related comorbidities for stages 1, 2, and 3, respectively. In the models including age, sex, initial BMI, EOSS stage, and treatment time, lower EOSS stage and longer treatment times were independently associated with greater absolute (kg) and percentage of weight loss relative to initial body weight (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Patients attending this publicly funded, referral-based weight management clinic were more likely to be classified in the higher stages of EOSS. Patients in higher EOSS stages required longer treatment times to achieve similar weight outcomes as those in lower EOSS stages.

PMID:
26060580
PMCID:
PMC4427774
DOI:
10.1155/2015/619734
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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