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Indian J Nephrol. 2015 May-Jun;25(3):146-51. doi: 10.4103/0971-4065.140712.

Dehydration and malaria augment the risk of developing chronic kidney disease in Sri Lanka.

Author information

1
Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine and Allied Sciences, Rajarata University of Sri Lanka, Saliyapura, Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka.
2
Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka.
3
Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka.
4
Department of Community Medicine, SAITM Faculty of Medicine, Malabe, Sri Lanka.
5
Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine and Allied Sciences, Rajarata University of Sri Lanka, Saliyapura, Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka.

Abstract

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) of unknown etiology (CKDu) is a serious health issue in Sri Lanka. One-to-one age and sex-matched two sample comparative study was carried out in the Medawachchiya divisional secretariat area of the North Central Province (NCP) of Sri Lanka, by randomly selecting 100 CKDu patients and 100 age and sex-matched subjects from non-CKDu affected families from the same area. An interviewer-administered questionnaire was used for the collection of data pertaining to occupation, medical history and lifestyle. Data were analyzed using a conditional linear logistic model. Working for >6 h in the field per day, exposure to sun, drinking water only from well, consumption of <3 L of water per day, and having a history of malaria were found to be having significant (P < 0.05) likelihood toward the development of CKDu. Treatment of water prior to consumption had a significant protective effect against CKDu. Dehydration, history of malaria and drinking untreated well water from are likely contribute to the development of CKD of unknown etiology among the inhabitants of NCP, Sri Lanka.

KEYWORDS:

Chronic kidney disease; dehydration; malaria; risk factors; water

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