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Metabolism. 2015 Sep;64(9):1183-92. doi: 10.1016/j.metabol.2015.05.011. Epub 2015 May 21.

Sliding-scale insulin used for blood glucose control: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacy, Taipei Medical University-Shuang Ho Hospital, New Taipei City, Taiwan; College of Pharmacy, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan.
2
Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University -Taipei Medical Hospital, New Taipei City, Taiwan; Center for Evidence-Based Health Care, Taipei Medical University-Shuang Ho Hospital, New Taipei City, Taiwan.
3
Department of Pharmacy, Taipei Medical University-Shuang Ho Hospital, New Taipei City, Taiwan.
4
Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; Division of Endocrinology & Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University - Shuang Ho Hospital, New Taipei City, Taiwan. Electronic address: antsz@s.tmu.edu.tw.
5
Center for Evidence-Based Health Care, Taipei Medical University-Shuang Ho Hospital, New Taipei City, Taiwan; Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; Division of General Surgery, Department of Surgery, Taipei Medical University - Shuang Ho Hospital, New Taipei City, Taiwan; Center for Evidence-Based Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan. Electronic address: kelvintam@h.tmu.edu.tw.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Sliding-scale insulin has been widely used in treating inpatient hyperglycemia. A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and possible adverse effects of sliding-scale insulin in hospitalized patients.

METHODS:

PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Scopus, and ClinicalTrials.gov registry were searched for studies published up to May 2015. Individual effect sizes were standardized, and a meta-analysis was performed to calculate a pooled effect size using random effects models.

RESULTS:

Eleven RCTs containing a total of 1322 patients were identified. Among eight studies in which the RISS was compared with other regimens, no significant difference was observed in the percentage of patients who achieved the mean blood glucose level between the two groups, which was determined according to the numbers of blood samples (RR: 2.84; 95% CI: 0.94 to 8.59) and patients (RR: 1.75; 95% CI: 0.86 to 3.55). The mean blood glucose level (weighted mean difference=27.33, 95% CI: 14.74 to 39.92) and incidence of hyperglycemic events were significantly higher in the RISS group than in the non-sliding-scale group. No significant difference in the incidence of severe hypoglycemia and length of hospitalization between the groups was identified.

CONCLUSIONS:

The overall results of the meta-analysis indicated that applying the RISS alone or in combination with other antidiabetic medications did not provide any benefits in blood glucose control, but was accompanied by an increased incidence of hyperglycemic events. Therefore, we suggest that the use of sliding-scale insulin be discontinued in hospitals.

KEYWORDS:

Diabetes; Hyperglycemia; Hypoglycemia; Meta-analysis; Sliding scale insulin

PMID:
26059853
DOI:
10.1016/j.metabol.2015.05.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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