Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Alcohol. 2015 Dec;49(8):817-24. doi: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2015.03.003. Epub 2015 May 14.

Corticostriatal circuitry and habitual ethanol seeking.

Author information

1
Department of Neuroscience, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425, USA. Electronic address: Barkerj@musc.edu.
2
School of Psychology, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
3
Bowles Center for Alcohol Studies, Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
4
Department of Psychology, Neuroscience Graduate Program, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.
5
Department of Pharmacology, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA.
6
Department of Neuroscience, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425, USA.

Abstract

The development of alcohol-use disorders is thought to involve a transition from casual alcohol use to uncontrolled alcohol-seeking behavior. This review will highlight evidence suggesting that the shift toward inflexible alcohol seeking that occurs across the development of addiction consists, in part, of a progression from goal-directed to habitual behaviors. This shift in "response strategy" is thought to be largely regulated by corticostriatal network activity. Indeed, specific neuroanatomical substrates within the prefrontal cortex and the striatum have been identified as playing opposing roles in the expression of actions and habits. A majority of the research on the neurobiology of habitual behavior has focused on non-drug reward seeking. Here, we will highlight recent research identifying corticostriatal structures that regulate the expression of habitual alcohol seeking and a comparison will be made when possible to findings for non-drug rewards.

KEYWORDS:

Alcohol; Dorsal striatum; Habit; Nucleus accumbens; Orbitofrontal cortex; Prefrontal cortex

PMID:
26059221
PMCID:
PMC4644517
DOI:
10.1016/j.alcohol.2015.03.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center