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J Am Coll Health. 2015;63(8):523-9. doi: 10.1080/07448481.2015.1043130.

Electronic Cigarette Use Among College Students: Links to Gender, Race/Ethnicity, Smoking, and Heavy Drinking.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use continues to rise, and current data regarding use of e-cigarettes among college students are needed. The purpose of this study was to examine e-cigarette use and the relation of such use with gender, race/ethnicity, traditional tobacco use, and heavy drinking.

PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS:

A sample of 599 college students enrolled in General Psychology at a state university completed a self-report questionnaire.

RESULTS:

Twenty-nine percent of students reported prior use of e-cigarettes, with 14% reporting use in the past 30 days. E-cigarette use was linked to male gender but not to race/ethnicity. Dual use (ie, concurrent use of both traditional and e-cigarettes) was related to heavier use of traditional and e-cigarettes, and nicotine use was linked to pronounced rates of heavy drinking.

CONCLUSIONS:

E-cigarette use among college students is exponentially on the rise, and its co-use with alcohol may contribute to negative outcomes in this population.

KEYWORDS:

college students; e-cigarette; electronic cigarette; heavy drinking; smoking; tobacco use

PMID:
26057365
DOI:
10.1080/07448481.2015.1043130
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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