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Phytochemistry. 2015 Sep;117:34-42. doi: 10.1016/j.phytochem.2015.05.021. Epub 2015 Jun 5.

Diacylglyceryltrimethylhomoserine content and gene expression changes triggered by phosphate deprivation in the mycelium of the basidiomycete Flammulina velutipes.

Author information

1
Komarov Botanical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 2 Professor Popov str., St. Petersburg 197376, Russia. Electronic address: senik@binran.ru.
2
Vavilov Institute of General Genetics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 3 Gubkina str., Moscow 119991, Russia.
3
Komarov Botanical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 2 Professor Popov str., St. Petersburg 197376, Russia.
4
A.N. Bach Institute of Biochemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, 33 Leninsky pr., Moscow 117071, Russia.

Abstract

Diacylglyceryltrimethylhomoserines (DGTS) are betaine-type lipids that are phosphate-free analogs of phosphatidylcholines (PC). DGTS are abundant in some bacteria, algae, primitive vascular plants and fungi. In this study, we report inorganic phosphate (Pi) deficiency-induced DGTS synthesis in the basidial fungus Flammulina velutipes (Curt.: Fr.) Sing. We present results of an expression analysis of the BTA1 gene that codes for betaine lipid synthase and two genes of PC biosynthesis (CHO2 and CPT1) during phosphate starvation of F. velutipes culture. We demonstrate that FvBTA1 gene has increased transcript abundance under phosphate starvation. Despite depletion in PC, both CHO2 and CPT1 were determined to have increased expression. We also describe the deduced amino acid sequence and genomic structure of the BTA1 gene in F. velutipes. Phylogenetic relationships between putative orthologs of BTA1 proteins of basidiomycete fungi are discussed.

KEYWORDS:

BTA1; Basidiomycetes; Betaine lipid; CHO2; CPT1; Flammulina velutipes; Gene expression; Glycerolipid metabolism; Phosphate starvation; Phylogenetic analysis

PMID:
26057227
DOI:
10.1016/j.phytochem.2015.05.021
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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