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J Proteomics. 2015 Aug 3;126:54-67. doi: 10.1016/j.jprot.2015.05.037. Epub 2015 Jun 6.

Quantitative proteomic analysis of paired colorectal cancer and non-tumorigenic tissues reveals signature proteins and perturbed pathways involved in CRC progression and metastasis.

Author information

1
Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Sciences, Macquarie University, North Ryde, NSW 2109, Australia.
2
Department of Pathology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752, Republic of Korea.
3
Department of Biomedical Sciences, Macquarie University, North Ryde, NSW 2109, Australia.
4
Yonsei Proteome Research Center, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749, Republic of Korea.
5
Department of Biomedical Sciences, Macquarie University, North Ryde, NSW 2109, Australia; Barnett Institute, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
6
Department of Biomedical Sciences, Macquarie University, North Ryde, NSW 2109, Australia. Electronic address: susan.fanayan@mq.edu.au.

Abstract

Modern proteomics has proven instrumental in our understanding of the molecular deregulations associated with the development and progression of cancer. Herein, we profile membrane-enriched proteome of tumor and adjacent normal tissues from eight CRC patients using label-free nanoLC-MS/MS-based quantitative proteomics and advanced pathway analysis. Of the 948 identified proteins, 184 proteins were differentially expressed (P<0.05, fold change>1.5) between the tumor and non-tumor tissue (69 up-regulated and 115 down-regulated in tumor tissues). The CRC tumor and non-tumor tissues clustered tightly in separate groups using hierarchical cluster analysis of the differentially expressed proteins, indicating a strong CRC-association of this proteome subset. Specifically, cancer associated proteins such as FN1, TNC, DEFA1, ITGB2, MLEC, CDH17, EZR and pathways including actin cytoskeleton and RhoGDI signaling were deregulated. Stage-specific proteome signatures were identified including up-regulated ribosomal proteins and down-regulated annexin proteins in early stage CRC. Finally, EGFR(+) CRC tissues showed an EGFR-dependent down-regulation of cell adhesion molecules, relative to EGFR(-) tissues. Taken together, this study provides a detailed map of the altered proteome and associated protein pathways in CRC, which enhances our mechanistic understanding of CRC biology and opens avenues for a knowledge-driven search for candidate CRC protein markers.

KEYWORDS:

Colorectal cancer; Epidermal growth factor receptor; Fibronectin; Label free shotgun proteomics; Malectin; Membrane proteins

PMID:
26054784
DOI:
10.1016/j.jprot.2015.05.037
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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