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Nat Neurosci. 2015 Jul;18(7):953-5. doi: 10.1038/nn.4040. Epub 2015 Jun 8.

Polygenic risk scores for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder predict creativity.

Author information

1
1] deCODE Genetics/Amgen, Reykjavík, Iceland. [2] MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, UK.
2
deCODE Genetics/Amgen, Reykjavík, Iceland.
3
Erasmus School of Economics, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
4
Department of Biological Psychology and Netherlands Twin Register, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
5
Department of Economics, Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
6
Radboud University Medical Center, Radboud Institute for Health Sciences, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
7
Center for Experimental Social Science, New York University, New York, New York, USA.
8
Center for Economic and Social Research, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA.
9
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
10
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neuroscience, Stockholm, Sweden.
11
Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Epidemiology, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
12
1] Department of Psychiatry, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavík, Iceland. [2] Department of Anthropology, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland.
13
1] deCODE Genetics/Amgen, Reykjavík, Iceland. [2] Department of Anthropology, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland.
14
Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Abstract

We tested whether polygenic risk scores for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder would predict creativity. Higher scores were associated with artistic society membership or creative profession in both Icelandic (P = 5.2 × 10(-6) and 3.8 × 10(-6) for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder scores, respectively) and replication cohorts (P = 0.0021 and 0.00086). This could not be accounted for by increased relatedness between creative individuals and those with psychoses, indicating that creativity and psychosis share genetic roots.

PMID:
26053403
DOI:
10.1038/nn.4040
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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