Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nature. 2015 Jun 18;522(7556):309-14. doi: 10.1038/nature14445. Epub 2015 Jun 8.

Hippocampal-prefrontal input supports spatial encoding in working memory.

Author information

1
Department of Physiology and Cellular Biophysics, Columbia University, 630 West 168th Street, New York, New York 10032, USA.
2
1] Department of Neuroscience, Columbia University, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, New York 10032, USA [2] IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598, USA [3] Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America, Columbia University, 1161 Amsterdam Avenue, New York, New York 10032, USA.
3
1] Translational Neuroscience Program, Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, 450 Techology Drive, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15219, USA [2] Center for Neuroscience and Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition, University of Pittsburgh, 200 Lothrop Drive, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261, USA.
4
1] Department of Neuroscience, Columbia University, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, New York 10032, USA [2] Kavli Institute for Brain Sciences, Columbia University, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, New York 10032, USA.
5
1] Department of Physiology and Cellular Biophysics, Columbia University, 630 West 168th Street, New York, New York 10032, USA [2] Department of Neuroscience, Columbia University, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, New York 10032, USA.
6
1] Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, New York 10032, USA [2] Division of Integrative Neuroscience, New York State Psychiatric Institute, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, New York 10032, USA.

Abstract

Spatial working memory, the caching of behaviourally relevant spatial cues on a timescale of seconds, is a fundamental constituent of cognition. Although the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus are known to contribute jointly to successful spatial working memory, the anatomical pathway and temporal window for the interaction of these structures critical to spatial working memory has not yet been established. Here we find that direct hippocampal-prefrontal afferents are critical for encoding, but not for maintenance or retrieval, of spatial cues in mice. These cues are represented by the activity of individual prefrontal units in a manner that is dependent on hippocampal input only during the cue-encoding phase of a spatial working memory task. Successful encoding of these cues appears to be mediated by gamma-frequency synchrony between the two structures. These findings indicate a critical role for the direct hippocampal-prefrontal afferent pathway in the continuous updating of task-related spatial information during spatial working memory.

PMID:
26053122
PMCID:
PMC4505751
DOI:
10.1038/nature14445
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center