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Complement Ther Med. 2015 Jun;23(3):405-12. doi: 10.1016/j.ctim.2015.03.006. Epub 2015 Mar 20.

Stress Management and Relaxation Techniques use among underserved inpatients in an inner city hospital.

Author information

1
Department of Family Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA, United States. Electronic address: Paula.gardiner@bmc.org.
2
Department of Family Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA, United States.
3
Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, United States.
4
Division of General Medicine and Primary Care, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States.
5
Department of Epidemiology, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, United States.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Little is known about the use of Stress Management and Relaxation Techniques (SMART) in racially diverse inpatients. We hope to identify socioeconomic status (SES) factors, health behavior factors, and clinical factors associated with the use of SMART.

DESIGN AND MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

We conducted a secondary analysis of baseline data from 623 hospitalized patients enrolled in the Re-Engineered Discharge (RED) clinical trial. We assessed socio-demographic characteristics and use of SMART. We used bivariate and multivariate logistic regression to test the association of SMART with socio-demographic characteristics, health behaviors, and clinical factors.

RESULTS:

A total of 26.6% of participants reported using SMART and 23.6% used mind body techniques. Thirty six percent of work disabled patients, 39% of illicit drug users, and 38% of participants with depressive symptoms used SMART. Patients who both reported illicit drug use and screened positive for depression had significantly increased odds of using SMART [OR=4.94, 95% CI (1.59, 15.13)]. Compared to non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks [0.55 (0.34-0.87)] and Hispanic/other race individuals [0.40 (0.20-0.76)] were less likely to use SMART.

CONCLUSIONS:

We found greater utilization of SMART among all racial groups compared to previous national studies. In the inner city inpatient setting, patients with depression, illicit drug use, and work disability reported higher rates of using SMART.

KEYWORDS:

Complementary and alternative medicine; Health literacy; Relaxation therapy; Stress management

PMID:
26051576
PMCID:
PMC4460566
DOI:
10.1016/j.ctim.2015.03.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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