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Neuron. 2015 Jun 17;86(6):1385-92. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2015.05.022. Epub 2015 Jun 4.

Motor Learning Consolidates Arc-Expressing Neuronal Ensembles in Secondary Motor Cortex.

Author information

1
Unit on Neural Circuits and Adaptive Behaviors, Clinical and Translational Neuroscience Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA; Department of Neuroscience, Brown University-National Institutes of Health Graduate Partnerships Program, Providence, RI 02912, USA.
2
Unit on Neural Circuits and Adaptive Behaviors, Clinical and Translational Neuroscience Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.
3
Champalimaud Neuroscience Programme, Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown, 1400-038 Lisbon, Portugal; National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. Electronic address: rui.costa@neuro.fchampalimaud.org.
4
Unit on Neural Circuits and Adaptive Behaviors, Clinical and Translational Neuroscience Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. Electronic address: wkuan@mail.nih.gov.

Abstract

Motor behaviors recruit task-specific neuronal ensembles in motor cortices, which are consolidated over subsequent learning. However, little is known about the molecules that can identify the participating neurons and predict the outcomes of the consolidation process. Using a mouse rotarod-learning task, we showed that lesion or inactivation of the secondary motor (M2) cortex disrupts learning of skilled movements. We tracked the endogenous promoter activity of the neuronal activity-regulated gene Arc in individual M2 neurons during rotarod learning by in vivo two-photon imaging of a knockin reporter. We found that task training initially recruits Arc-promoter-activated neurons and then consolidates them into a specific ensemble exhibiting persistent reactivation of Arc-promoter. The intensity of a neuron's initial Arc-promoter activation predicts its reactivation probability and neurons with weak initial Arc-promoter activation are dismissed from the ensemble during subsequent training. Our findings demonstrate a task-specific Arc-dependent cellular consolidation process in M2 cortex during motor learning.

PMID:
26051420
PMCID:
PMC4474764
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2015.05.022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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