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Reprod Toxicol. 2015 Aug 15;56:118-40. doi: 10.1016/j.reprotox.2015.05.015. Epub 2015 Jun 4.

A perspective on the developmental toxicity of inhaled nanoparticles.

Author information

1
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: ksh@nrcwe.dk.
2
University of Tor Vergata, Dept. Biomedicine and Prevention, Rome, Italy.
3
INRA, UMR1198 Biologie du Développement et Reproduction, Jouy-en-Josas, France; Fondation PremUp, Paris, France.
4
National Institute for Public Health and the Environment RIVM, Bilthoven, The Netherlands.
5
National Institute for Public Health and the Environment RIVM, Bilthoven, The Netherlands; Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
6
Institute of Occupational Medicine, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK.
7
Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK.
8
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
9
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark; Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark.
10
Inserm and Univ. Grenoble-Alpes, Team of Environmental Epidemiology applied to Reproduction and Respiratory Health, Grenoble, France.

Abstract

This paper aimed to clarify whether maternal inhalation of engineered nanoparticles (NP) may constitute a hazard to pregnancy and fetal development, primarily based on experimental animal studies of NP and air pollution particles. Overall, it is plausible that NP may translocate from the respiratory tract to the placenta and fetus, but also that adverse effects may occur secondarily to maternal inflammatory responses. The limited database describes several organ systems in the offspring to be potentially sensitive to maternal inhalation of particles, but large uncertainties exist about the implications for embryo-fetal development and health later in life. Clearly, the potential for hazard remains to be characterized. Considering the increased production and application of nanomaterials and related consumer products a testing strategy for NP should be established. Due to large gaps in data, significant amounts of groundwork are warranted for a testing strategy to be established on a sound scientific basis.

KEYWORDS:

Developmental toxicity; Inhalation; Instillation; Nanomaterial; Nanoparticles; Pregnancy; Reproductive toxicity; Ultrafine particles

PMID:
26050605
DOI:
10.1016/j.reprotox.2015.05.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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