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J Pediatr Urol. 2015 Aug;11(4):209.e1-6. doi: 10.1016/j.jpurol.2015.04.016. Epub 2015 May 21.

30-Day morbidity after augmentation enterocystoplasty and appendicovesicostomy: A NSQIP pediatric analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Urology, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA; Harvard-wide Pediatric Health Services Research Fellowship, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: Erin.mcnamara@childrens.harvard.edu.
2
Department of Urology, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA. Electronic address: Michael.kurtz@childrens.harvard.edu.
3
Department of Urology, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA. Electronic address: Anthony.schaeffer@childrens.harvard.edu.
4
Center for Clinical Research, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA. Electronic address: Tanya.logvinenko@childrens.harvard.edu.
5
Department of Urology, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA. Electronic address: Caleb.nelson@childrens.harvard.edu.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Augmentation enterocystoplasty and appendicovesicostomy are complex pediatric urologic procedures. Although there is literature identifying long-term outcomes in these patients, the reporting of short-term postoperative outcomes has been limited by small numbers of cases and lack of prospective data collection. Here we report 30-day outcomes from the first nationally based, prospectively assembled cohort of pediatric patients undergoing these procedures.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine 30-day complication, readmission and reoperation after augmentation enterocystoplasty and appendicovesicostomy in a large national sample of pediatric patients, and to explore the association between preoperative and intraoperative characteristics and occurrence of any 30-day event.

STUDY DESIGN:

We queried the 2012 and 2013 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Pediatric database (ACS-NSQIPP) for all patients undergoing augmentation enterocystoplasty and/or appendicovesicostomy. Surgical risk score was classified on a linear scale using a validated pediatric-specific comorbidity score. Intraoperative characteristics and postoperative 30-day events were reported from prospectively collected data. A composite measure of complication, readmission and/or reoperation was used as primary outcome for the multivariate logistic regression.

RESULTS:

There were 461 patients included in the analysis: 245 had appendicovesicostomy, 97 had augmentation enterocystoplasty and 119 had both procedures. There were a total of 110 NSQIP complications seen in 87 patients. The most common complication was urinary tract infection (see Table for 30-day outcomes by patient). The composite measure of any 30-day event was seen in 27.8% of the cohort and this was associated with longer operative time, increased number of procedures done at time of primary surgical procedure and higher surgical risk score.

DISCUSSION:

The ACS-NSQIPP provides a tool to examine short-term outcomes for these complex urologic procedures that has not been possible before. Although ACS-NSQIP has been used extensively in the adult surgical literature to identify rates of complications, and to determine predictors of readmission and adverse events, its use in pediatric surgery is new. As in the adult literature, the goal is for standardization of practice and transparency in reporting outcomes that may lead to reduction in morbidity and mortality.

CONCLUSION:

In this cohort, any 30-day event is seen in almost 30% of the patients undergoing these urologic procedures. Operative time, number of concurrent procedures and higher surgical risk score all are associated with higher odds of the composite 30-day event of complication, readmission and/or reoperation. These data can be useful in counseling patients and families about expectations around surgery and in improving outcomes.

KEYWORDS:

Appendicovesicostomy; Augmentation enterocystoplasty; Complications; Pediatrics

PMID:
26049255
PMCID:
PMC4540660
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpurol.2015.04.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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