Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Clin Psychol Rev. 2015 Aug;40:28-39. doi: 10.1016/j.cpr.2015.05.006. Epub 2015 May 27.

Evaluating factors and interventions that influence help-seeking and mental health service utilization among suicidal individuals: A review of the literature.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Florida State University, 1107 West Call Street, Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA. Electronic address: hom@psy.fsu.edu.
2
Department of Psychology, Florida State University, 1107 West Call Street, Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA.

Abstract

Connecting suicidal individuals to appropriate mental health care services is a key component of suicide prevention efforts. This review aims to critically discuss the extant literature on help-seeking and mental health service utilization among individuals at elevated risk for suicide, as well as to outline challenges and future directions for research in this area. Across studies, the rate of mental health service use for those with past-year suicide ideation, plans, and/or attempts was approximately 29.5% based on weighted averages, with a lack of perceived need for services, preference for self-management, fear of hospitalization, and structural factors (e.g., time, finances) identified as key barriers to care. Studies also revealed facilitators to care, which include mental health literacy, positive views of services, and encouragement from family or friends to seek support. To address these low rates of help-seeking and barriers to care, a number of interventions have been developed, including psychoeducation-based programs, peer and gatekeeper training, and screening-based approaches. Despite these efforts, it appears that work is still needed to gauge the impact of these interventions on behavioral outcomes and to more rigorously test their effectiveness. Additional implications for future research on help-seeking among suicidal individuals are discussed.

KEYWORDS:

Barriers; Help-seeking; Suicide; Suicide prevention

PMID:
26048165
DOI:
10.1016/j.cpr.2015.05.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center