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Arch Toxicol. 2016 May;90(5):1025-1048. doi: 10.1007/s00204-015-1543-4. Epub 2015 Jun 6.

Experimental models of liver fibrosis.

Author information

1
Department of In Vitro Toxicology and Dermato-Cosmetology, Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
2
Department of Pathology, School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
3
Department of Hepato-Gastroenterology, Algemeen Stedelijk Ziekenhuis, Aalst, Belgium.
4
Department of Abdominal Surgery and Hepato-Pancreatico-Biliary Surgery, Algemeen Stedelijk Ziekenhuis, Aalst, Belgium.
5
Department of Gastroenterology, Clinical Division, Hepatology Branch, University of São Paulo School of Medicine, São Paulo, Brazil.
6
Laboratory of Medical Investigation, Department of Pathology, University of São Paulo School of Medicine, São Paulo, Brazil.
7
Department of Pathology, University of São Paulo School of Medicine, São Paulo, Brazil.
8
Laboratoire d'Hépato-Gastro-Entérologie, Institut de Recherche Expérimentale et Clinique, Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium.
#
Contributed equally

Abstract

Hepatic fibrosis is a wound healing response to insults and as such affects the entire world population. In industrialized countries, the main causes of liver fibrosis include alcohol abuse, chronic hepatitis virus infection and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. A central event in liver fibrosis is the activation of hepatic stellate cells, which is triggered by a plethora of signaling pathways. Liver fibrosis can progress into more severe stages, known as cirrhosis, when liver acini are substituted by nodules, and further to hepatocellular carcinoma. Considerable efforts are currently devoted to liver fibrosis research, not only with the goal of further elucidating the molecular mechanisms that drive this disease, but equally in view of establishing effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The present paper provides a state-of-the-art overview of in vivo and in vitro models used in the field of experimental liver fibrosis research.

KEYWORDS:

Animal models; Hepatic stellate cells; In vitro models; Liver fibrosis

PMID:
26047667
PMCID:
PMC4705434
DOI:
10.1007/s00204-015-1543-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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