Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol. 2015 Sep;28(3):210-7. doi: 10.1177/0891988715588831. Epub 2015 Jun 4.

A Pilot Study of a Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for Anxiety and Depression in Patients With Parkinson Disease.

Author information

1
Houston VA Health Services Research and Development (HSR&D) Center for Innovations in Quality, Effectiveness and Safety, Houston, TX, USA Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, TX, USA Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA jcalleo@bcm.edu.
2
Houston VA Health Services Research and Development (HSR&D) Center for Innovations in Quality, Effectiveness and Safety, Houston, TX, USA Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.
3
Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, TX, USA Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.
4
Houston VA Health Services Research and Development (HSR&D) Center for Innovations in Quality, Effectiveness and Safety, Houston, TX, USA Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, TX, USA Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA VA South Central Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Center.
5
Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.

Abstract

Anxiety and depression often remain unrecognized or inadequately treated in patients with Parkinson disease (PD). Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is effective, but limited evidence supports its use for anxiety and depression in patients with PD. Sixteen patients with PD having significant anxiety and/or depressive symptoms were assigned to CBT or enhanced usual care. Assessments occurred at baseline, posttreatment, and 1-month follow-up. The CBT intervention included tools for anxiety, depression, and healthy living with PD symptoms. Individual sessions were delivered by telephone or in person, based on patient preference. Treatment was feasible with participants choosing 67% of sessions by telephone and 80% completed treatment. The between-group effect sizes for change scores from baseline to posttreatment and baseline to 1-month follow-up were large (posttreatment: d = 1.49 for depression and 1.44 for anxiety; 1-month follow-up: d = .73 for depression and 1.24 for anxiety), although only the posttreatment effect size for depression was significant. This pilot CBT program is feasible for treatment of anxiety and depression in patients with PD.

KEYWORDS:

Parkinson disease; anxiety; cognitive–behavioral therapy; depression

PMID:
26047635
DOI:
10.1177/0891988715588831
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center