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Immunol Lett. 2015 Aug;166(2):92-102. doi: 10.1016/j.imlet.2015.05.012. Epub 2015 Jun 1.

Coenzyme Q10 suppresses Th17 cells and osteoclast differentiation and ameliorates experimental autoimmune arthritis mice.

Author information

1
The Rheumatism Research Center, Catholic Research Institute of Medical Science, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, South Korea. Electronic address: jhunjy@catholic.ac.kr.
2
The Rheumatism Research Center, Catholic Research Institute of Medical Science, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, South Korea. Electronic address: redcap817@catholic.ac.kr.
3
The Rheumatism Research Center, Catholic Research Institute of Medical Science, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, South Korea. Electronic address: jkbyun0228@catholic.ac.kr.
4
Impact Biotech, Korea 505 Banpo-Dong, Seocho-Ku, Seoul 137-040, South Korea. Electronic address: jjeonghee1@catholic.ac.kr.
5
The Rheumatism Research Center, Catholic Research Institute of Medical Science, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, South Korea. Electronic address: mnikek@catholic.ac.kr.
6
The Rheumatism Research Center, Catholic Research Institute of Medical Science, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, South Korea; Divison of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-040, South Korea. Electronic address: poohish@naver.com.
7
Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital and Hallym University, Seoul, South Korea. Electronic address: yjung@hallym.ac.kr.
8
College of Pharmacy, Gachon University, Incheon, South Korea. Electronic address: dyshin@gachon.ac.kr.
9
The Rheumatism Research Center, Catholic Research Institute of Medical Science, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, South Korea; Divison of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-040, South Korea. Electronic address: rapark@catholic.ac.kr.
10
The Rheumatism Research Center, Catholic Research Institute of Medical Science, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, South Korea; Divison of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-040, South Korea. Electronic address: iammila@catholic.ac.kr.

Abstract

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a lipid-soluble antioxidant synthesized in human body. This enzyme promotes immune system function and can be used as a dietary supplement. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease leading to chronic joint inflammation. RA results in severe destruction of cartilage and disability. This study aimed to investigate the effect of CoQ10 on inflammation and Th17 cell proliferation on an experimental rheumatoid arthritis (RA) mice model. CoQ10 or cotton seed oil as control was orally administrated once a day for seven weeks to mice with zymosan-induced arthritis (ZIA). Histological analysis of the joints was conducted using immunohistochemistry. Germinal center (GC) B cells, Th17 cells and Treg cells of the spleen tissue were examined by confocal microscopy staining. mRNA expression was measured by real-time PCR and protein levels were estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Flow cytometric analysis (FACS) was used to evaluate Th17 cells and Treg cells. CoQ10 mitigated the severity of ZIA and decreased serum immunoglobulin concentrations. CoQ10 also reduced RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis, inflammatory mediators and oxidant factors. Th17/Treg axis was reciprocally controlled by CoQ10 treatment. Moreover, CoQ10 treatment on normal mouse and human cells cultured in Th17 conditions decreased the number of Th17 cells and enhanced the number of Treg cells. CoQ10 alleviates arthritis in mice with ZIA declining inflammation, Th17 cells and osteoclast differentiation. These findings suggest that CoQ10 can be a potential therapeutic substance for RA.

KEYWORDS:

Coenzyme Q10; Joint inflammation; Rheumatoid arthritis

PMID:
26045320
DOI:
10.1016/j.imlet.2015.05.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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