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Nicotine Tob Res. 2016 Mar;18(3):351-60. doi: 10.1093/ntr/ntv119. Epub 2015 Jun 4.

Effect of a Digital Social Media Campaign on Young Adult Smoking Cessation.

Author information

1
Applied Health Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada; Propel Centre for Population Health Impact, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada; nbbaskerville@uwaterloo.ca.
2
Applied Health Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada; Propel Centre for Population Health Impact, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada;
3
Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; CENSE Research + Design, Toronto, ON, Canada;
4
Smokers' Helpline, Canadian Cancer Society, Toronto, ON, Canada;
5
Propel Centre for Population Health Impact, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada; Statistics and Actuarial Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Social media (SM) may extend the reach and impact for smoking cessation among young adult smokers. To-date, little research targeting young adults has been done on the use of SM to promote quitting smoking. We assessed the effect of an innovative multicomponent web-based and SM approach known as Break-it-Off (BIO) on young adult smoking cessation.

METHODS:

The study employed a quasi-experimental design with baseline and 3-month follow-up data from 19 to 29-year old smokers exposed to BIO (n = 102 at follow-up) and a comparison group of Smokers' Helpline (SHL) users (n = 136 at follow-up). Logistic regression analysis assessed differences between groups on self-reported 7-day and 30-day point prevalence cessation rates, adjusting for ethnicity, education level, and cigarette use (daily or occasional) at baseline.

RESULTS:

The campaign reached 37 325 unique visitors with a total of 44 172 visits. BIO users had significantly higher 7-day and 30-day quit rates compared with users of SHL. At 3-month follow-up, BIO participants (32.4%) were more likely than SHL participants (14%) to have quit smoking for 30 days (odds ratio = 2.95, 95% CI = 1.56 to 5.57, P < .001) and BIO participants (91%) were more likely than SHL participants (79%) to have made a quit attempt (odds ratio = 2.69, 95% CI = 1.03 to 6.99, P = .04).

CONCLUSION:

The reach of the campaign and findings on quitting success indicate that a digital/SM platform can complement the traditional SHL cessation service for young adult smokers seeking help to quit.

PMID:
26045252
DOI:
10.1093/ntr/ntv119
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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