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Comput Biol Med. 2015 Oct 1;65:177-83. doi: 10.1016/j.compbiomed.2015.05.008. Epub 2015 May 21.

Feasibility of a semi-automated method for cardiac conduction velocity analysis of high-resolution activation maps.

Author information

1
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University, St Louis, USA.
2
L'Institut de RYthmologie et de Modélisation Cardiaque (LIRYC), Fondation Université Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France.
3
Heart Center, Departments of Experimental Cardiology, Cardiology, and Cardiothoracic Surgery, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
4
Department of Biomedical Engineering, George Washington University, Washington D.C., USA.
5
L'Institut de RYthmologie et de Modélisation Cardiaque (LIRYC), Fondation Université Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France; Centre de Recherche Cardio-Thoracique de Bordeaux Inserm U1045, Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France.
6
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University, St Louis, USA; L'Institut de RYthmologie et de Modélisation Cardiaque (LIRYC), Fondation Université Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France; Department of Biomedical Engineering, George Washington University, Washington D.C., USA.
7
Department of Biomedical Engineering, George Washington University, Washington D.C., USA. Electronic address: bjboukens@gwu.edu.
8
L'Institut de RYthmologie et de Modélisation Cardiaque (LIRYC), Fondation Université Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France; Heart Center, Departments of Experimental Cardiology, Cardiology, and Cardiothoracic Surgery, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Abstract

Myocardial conduction velocity is important for the genesis of arrhythmias. In the normal heart, conduction is primarily dependent on fiber direction (anisotropy) and may be discontinuous at sites with tissue heterogeneities (trabeculated or fibrotic tissue). We present a semi-automated method for the accurate measurement of conduction velocity based on high-resolution activation mapping following central stimulation. The method was applied to activation maps created from myocardium from man, sheep and mouse with anisotropic and discontinuous conduction. Advantages of the presented method over existing methods are discussed.

KEYWORDS:

Arrhythmia; Conduction velocity; Electrophysiology; Fibrosis; Optical mapping

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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